Competitor Research In Adwords

Want to know how you stack up against your competition when it comes to Adwords? There’s actually a handy report easily accessibly in Adwords that will tell you JUST that.

Here’s how you get to it:

Select the “Details” dropdown menu on the all campaigns dashboard view after logging into your Adwords account and select all under “Auction Insights.”

auction insights

Once in the Auction Insights Report there are some pretty interesting insights. First, you’ll see who Adwords considers your competitors based on the keywords you are bidding on. In this example (screenshot below), the competitor sites are blurred out, but in your account you’ll have actual URLs of competitors. You may find you have some competitors you weren’t even aware of who are running on the very same keywords as you.

There are some terms in the report that are familiar to you if you’ve been running ads already such as “average position” this is the average position of your ads. However, the rest of these columns may be new to you, so I have written out explanations below:

auction insights

Impression share: shows you how often you are showing up for your keywords. The higher this is the better you’re doing at this. (We’re getting close to 94% of the impression share in the above example which is great!)

Overlap rate: the percentage of times that your ads show WITH your competitor’s ads.

Position above rate: this is the percentage of times that a competitor is ranking above you.  Perhaps you have a competitor who is ranking above you a good amount of time. In this screenshot below I have one competitor who is ranking above me over 70% of the time. Crazy right? Don’t freak out just yet. Take a look at the overlap rate, we only overlap on terms under 9% of the time. So while looking at this report, focus on your main competitors and don’t get caught up in trying to out bid every competitor on every term.

Photo 4

Top of page rate: another interesting metric calculates the percentage of times you or your compeitior’s ads are showing up in the top three ads on a page.

Outranking share: this one is a bit of formula which I’ve written out below,

Number of times your ad ranked higher in an auction than a competitor (plus) the number of times your ads showed when your competitor’s did not (divided by) total number of ad auctions you participated in.

The auction insights report is incredibly simple but a great resource to use to see how you stack up against the competition.

Google Analytics For Social

Understanding the impact your social campaign is having on your overall website traffic can be difficult if yoSocial - Analytics (Photo 1)u’re not sure where to look. Did you know that Google Analytics has a whole section devoted just to social? Below I’ll take you through it!

First, how do you get there? The social section sits right under Acquisition (see screenshot). Once you’re there I recommend starting first on the overview section. Please keep in mind that this section  is really only helpful if you have goals set up in analytics (goals=conversions). Otherwise you have no conversions to track. Not familiar with goals? Check out how to set up goals in analytics here.

Overview

While in overview, you’ll see just that, an overview of conversions that your social channel is driving (the social channel can encompass multiple social networks). The circle graph shows your total conversions, contributed social conversions and your “last interaction” social conversions.

Social - Analytics (Photo 2)

 

Before we dive any further let’s define these three terms:

Conversions: A conversion happens  when someone takes an action that you’ve defined as valuable to your business, such as an online purchase or filling out a form on your site.

Contributed social conversions: The number of conversions that any of the social networks in the social channel assisted in converting. This happens whenever the social channel appeared anywhere along along a customer’s conversion path except as the final channel.

Last interaction social conversions: This is the number of conversions that the social channel completed. Another way to think of this is this was the last channel that a customer interacted with before converting.

This is valuable because by looking at this chart along with the breakdown on the side of sessions and conversions you’ll start to see exactly how much your social channel is helping you not only drive customers to your site but also convert your customers.

Tip: I would recommend also checking out  “shared URLs” to see some of your most popular content on social.

Conversions

While we are on the topic of conversions let’s hop down to the conversions tab of this social section. Here, by clicking on Assisted vs. Last Interaction Analysis we can zoom in further on assisted or contributed conversions and last click or direct conversions. Keep in mind in this particular screenshot below we are looking just at Facebook. I see there were 2 assisted conversions and 1 last click conversions on this network in the selected time frame.

Social - Analytics (Photo 3)

In the final column I can see a ratio of Assisted/Last Click Conversions. If this number is over 1 that means that this social network, in this case Facebook, is more effective at providing assists than last click conversions.  So why is this valuable?

If you know Facebook is a more of a “first click” interaction as opposed to a “last click” interaction you can better target your social messaging to those new customers who have little to no knowledge of your brand.

Network Referrals

The network referrals section is interesting because it provides a side by side chart of your overall sessions (in orange) with your sessions from social referrals (in blue). This is a great way to quickly identify a post that did really well on social and resulted in a lot of sessions. Additionally, I like how down below all of this it breaks out the different social networks and the average time on site from each network. This might be a good way to identify which social network is driving your ideal customers to your site.

Social - Analytics (Photo 4)

User Flow

The one thing I don’t like about the user flow functionality in Analytics is how much traffic there is condensed into one large chart. That being said, the social channel only user flow is neat because it is only a portion of your overall sessions (just those from the social channel) and breaks it down by social network.

Social - Analytics (Photo 5)

 

Even though I didn’t go through everything in this post I would highly encourage exploring the other parts of this social tab in analytics. If you’re active on any of Google’s Data Hub Partners, there’s a whole section for that called Data Hub Activity.  The one Data Hub Partner that most of us are familiar with is Google+. This functionality allow you to dive into specific social “conversations” about your site. Beyond that, the landing pages tab is incredibly helpful as you can take a closer look at the most popular landing pages from your social channels.

Those are just a few of the tools in Analytics to help you dive deeper into your social analytics. Hopefully, a few of them can be helpful.

 

 

How To Claim A Duplicate Unmanaged Facebook Page

Have you experienced random duplicate Facebook pages popping up in searches on Facebook? This is not uncommon and often these Facebook “place” pages are auto-generated by Facebook. The good news is you can claim these pages and delete or in some cases actually merge them with your official page. Here’s how:

  1. Make sure you are logged into your personal profile versus your business profile.
  2. Navigate to the page you would like to claim.
  3. On the right hand side you should see the question “Is this your business?” unclaimed page example

4. Once you select this you will be able to follow the on-page instructions to claim ownership (through a phone call, email verification or with documentation).

5. Facebook will prompt you after they have verified you are the owner.

Screen Shot 2015-08-26 at 10.09.11 PM

6. After you have ownership (otherwise known as admin access) of the page navigate to the Settings section on the page.

Screen Shot 2015-08-26 at 10.28.48 PM

7. From here navigate to the General section and find the Remove  Page option at the bottom of the options.

Move Page

8. You will be prompted asking if you want to delete the page. At this point either the page will enter a deletion mode and you will have 14 days to undo this. Occasionally, the page will automatically be deleted.

9. As another option, you can select merge pages (right above the Remove Page option) and submit to have your page merged with another page. You will want to select the page you want to keep as the top dropdown and the page you want to merge into the page you are keeping as the second one. Facebook will decide if you can merge these pages, one important factor is the names need to be similar. Please note only likes and check-ins will be carried over not reviews, photos, username or any other content.

For more information please check out some of Facebook’s community forums. This particular post does a good job of addressing this question.

New Facebook Feature: Page Event Subscribers

Facebook has begun rolling out an exciting new feature that has a potential to offer tremendous benefits for small businesses. You can now get fans to subscribe to your events so they will automatically be notified anytime you are hosting an event near them. By clicking the subscribe button you have the unique opportunity to automatically notify all of your fans without investing additional money in Facebook Advertising to go after getting your event in front of fans. I noticed this new feature when one of my pages had a message this morning prompting us to “gather a community for your event” which is shown below.

Screen Shot 2015-04-29 at 12.47.53 PM

So I know what your thinking- “I’m a small business who doesn’t host events all the time- is this really worth it?” I think this feature can be utilized beyond its basic premise. One way is for contests. I know one challenge I’ve run into working with small businesses is that when we host a contest, we struggle to get the contest in front of all of our fans due to the limited organic reach on Facebook. By creating an event for your contest you create an easy way to quickly notify all of your subscribers about your contest and keep them posted on updates/and the final winner.

Another neat aspect of this is with the increasing focus on mobile these days in the aftermath of the Google algorithm update last week is that it takes into account the user’s location and notifies them of the event when they are nearby. Grabbing the attention of a fan of your business when they are in the area creates a strong call to action for them to attend your event.

I know I for one can’t wait to start gather my community of subscribers for events.

feedstory

Near Me Or Bust

I’ve always found it funny, and somewhat fascinating how the internet works. In a lot of ways the “world wide web” stands true to its name of truly being world wide, and has contributed in many ways to globalization in the 21st century. The online marketplace is thriving, and the collaboration of various individuals across multiple continents is happening every second of the day. Brands could broadcast a product or service on a global level. Global celebrities could happen overnight via a viral Youtube video.   So that’s why it’s funny to me that in the last few years local search has become more and more relevant. We have the world at our fingertips and yet our search results are tailored to uncover things in our own backyard?

There are probably a lot of reasons for this, but I think one stands out among the rest. That reason is we as a society are impatient and that impatience is a result of world wide web (talk about irony!).

“We have the world at our fingertips and yet our search results are tailored to uncover things in our own backyard?”

We have become accustomed to having answers right when we need them, to having devices in the palms of our hands that can be our wallet, communication device, and answer all of our questions. True, we can order things online and have it shipped to us in a day (perhaps in a few years via a drone in mere minutes). But we are more impatient now, we want services and things as fast as we want Google to answer “What’s the tallest building in North America?”

I think this impatience is why local search has become so important today. Also, it’s important to mention that the fact a person is using a search engine in the first place shows some intent on their part to travel to, to buy, or otherwise take action from that search. That’s also why local search matters so much because someone can act on their intent right that second. They can drive to that hair salon right now.

As a business owner it’s important to recognize local search and to leverage it. This all ties into an announcement from Google recently that caught my attention. Google announced a study that shows “near me” searches have surged 34 times since 2011  and 80% as to be expected came from mobile devices. The study goes on to say that brand loyalty did not seem to be a factor in these searches, users actually preferred the closest, or most convenient location for whatever particular service or product they needed.

So have we officially entered a new era of the internet? An era of localization? I don’t think it’s safe to say we’ve completely gone local, as there are still aspects of search that will forever be global. But being “near me” is definitely more valuable these days.

The Simple Guide To Multi-Channel Funnels In Google Analytics

No Conversion Is An Island

Just like no man is an island, no conversion happens without the help of multiple marketing channels. True, there are plenty of these “assists” that we cannot track. For instance, word-of-mouth is nearly impossible to track. If a friend tells you she loves her new shoes, and you go buy the same pair of shoes that shoe company may never know that it was your friend’s endorsement that got you to type their brand name into a google search bar. However, in the online world we do have the ability to track these assists to some extent, we call them “assisted conversions.” So what is an assisted conversion?

Here’s the technical definition via Google:

“This is the number of sales and conversions the channel assisted. If a channel appears anywhere—except as the final interaction—on a conversion path, it is considered an assist for that conversion. The higher these numbers, the more important the assist role of the channel.”

And here’s another way of explaining things, let’s say instead of hearing about that shoe company from your friend offline, instead you saw her comment on a photo on their company’s Facebook page. I go to that shoe company’s Facebook page, decide I really want to know if the shoes worn by the model in the cover photo come in red so I venture over to the site. BINGO! I get to the site and see that yes in fact they do come in red. But before buying, I just want to be sure there’s no other place I can find these shoes for less. So I check out a few department stores online, but they carry this specific red shoe I want. At this point I google the name of that shoe company again (because its’ easier to google things than type out the whole URL, right?) and I end up ordering those red shoes. In Google Analytics, organic search will be the channel that gets credit for this conversion, but since my first interaction with the shoe company was on social it will be considered an “assisted conversion.”  Social assisted organic in making the final conversion.

So why does this matter? Because oftentimes the assisted conversions provide us with some of the most valuable insights and we ignore it because frankly its hard to see. However, Multi-Channel Funnels in Google Analytics is here to solve that problem!

If you think “multi-channel funnel” is slightly intimidating, don’t worry, it’s actually one of the easiest things to understand in Analytics (in my opinion). You can get to it by navigating to the conversions tab on the bottom left hand side of your screen and then clicking Overview under “Multi-Channel Funnels.”

On the first half of the page, itScreen Shot 2015-04-15 at 9.23.17 PM breaks down how many conversions you had and how many were assisted.

As you scroll down to the second part of the page this is where things get interesting. You can place up to four channels in your Venn Diagram. It will show in the time frame selected how many times Direct & Social, Direct & Organic, and so forth assisted each other in making a Screen Shot 2015-04-15 at 9.27.24 PMconversion.

I normally only look at two channels at a time. You can scroll over the shaded area where the two circles overlap to see the percentage of conversions the two channels assisted each other on, as well as the actual number (in case you didn’t want to both doing the extra math).

This is a fantastic way to see which of your various channels are assisting each other in Google Analytics. And the best part is Analytics does all of the work for you!

The A-List and Other Tools of the Twitter Elite

  1. List building is great Twitter tool because you don’t have to actually follow someone to keep an eye on what they are tweeting. You can add them to a list so that you are able to put them into a feed to watch in programs such as TweetDeck. You can have your “A-List” companies you want to work with if you are a brand and you can engage with them on a regular basis so that you are able to attract their attention. Other lists could be industry-related influencers or news outlets that let you keep up on the changes in your field.

    Some of my very basic lists on my personal profile. Helps me to keep organized!

  2. I could talk all day on Twitter Chats and how they are the greatest thing out there. They let you engage with people who you share are common interest but would likely never interact with otherwise. How do they work? Basically at a specific hour once a week or once a month everyone follows a specific hashtag for that time and tweets answers to structured questions, asks questions, or simply just answers other people’s questions. Twitter Chats help you troubleshoot problems or find better ways around doing things. I’ve made plenty of twitter-friends in my industry through them and despite never having actually met theM, they are great to keep in touch with, especially since they are typically working in the same field as me. They have twitter chats for nearly every topic and if by chance you see one they don’t have out there, by all means start it yourself!

    Style Chat and Ask Forbes

    Two of my favorite chats-#stylechat & #askforbes

  3.  Sprout Social, if you aren’t on it you should get on it, especially if you are a brand. It gives you detailed reports, lets you do comprehensive brand monitoring, and the coolest feature-it lets you search conversations, twitter bios, or random tweets by location. The ability to search by location is very helpful and slightly creepy but it can do wonders for a brand looking to localize their messaging.

    sproutsocial

    Example of some Sprout Social Reporting Metrics.

Keys to Client Relationships

Communicate 

Be available to them and keep them in the loop. Always making the client aware of your actions is good because it lets them see the work you are doing as well as helps you make sure you are doing what they expect. Generally, as time goes on some clients may want less communication, which is normal and understandable. On that same note, there is one thing be cautious about, and that is devaluing their time by sending emails  that too long, or pointless. The general rule that I abide by is that if it takes writing a long email, it’s probably worth meeting in person. Also try to respond to their emails promptly, I’ve found they will treat you with the same respect and respond quickly to yours as well.

Anticipate Their Questions 

Anticipating what your client will need next is extremely important because it can be what sets you apart from not only other companies but in your industry looking seduce a lucrative client, but everyone they deal with on a daily basis. So, the next question is how do you go about this? Next time you give them suggestions for a project go a few steps further and think through all questions they might have.

Going into a business meeting an agenda and expanding on that agenda certainly means extra work but it shows you really through things through. It will make you stand out; so go ahead and shine.

Treat them like people not clients

Learn their subjective biases. It isn’t sucking up, it’s learning how to present your information to them in a way they will best understand. If your client isn’t good with certain programs, find what they are familiar with and adapt to them. Clients want someone they can trust, and treating them like a person will help establish that trust. It is easy to get caught up in formalities, but don’t forget to be a friend.